Stargazers catch sight of ‘super blood moon’

Across several continents, people glimpsed a rare celestial phenomenon. A lunar eclipse, which gave the moon a distinctive red hue, took place as the earth and moon were at their closest.

The moon was at its largest in the sky at the same time a lunar eclipse was visible from the Americas, Europe, Africa and western Asia late Sunday into Monday.

Supermoons occur when the moon is at its closest point to the earth, while also in its brightest phase. As a result, the moon looks far brighter and larger than it might at its furthest point. This time, it coincided with a lunar eclipse as the Earth’s shadow blocked out most of the light that would normally bathe the moon. The result was a rare “super blood moon,” last seen in 1982.

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Source News: DW